|

insurance adjusters course

|

adjuster products

|

adjuster services

|

|

catastrophe_adjuster adjuster training insurance adjuster adjuster license


To Select Adjuster Training Products
 for your state:

how to become insurance adjuster


See what our 
clients have to say about us!

 

Online Practice Exam Simulator
Logon Links

Simulator Logon
($39.95 program)

Simulator Logon
($49.95 program)

Need assistance with one of our products?
Click Here!


Texas Insurance Adjuster Training

Florida Public 
Insurance Adjuster

California
Insurance Adjuster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjuster Licensing & Training

BECOME AN INSURANCE ADJUSTER by becoming licensed in the state in which you would like to work!

Adjusters Virtual Classroom:

This state-of-the-art program will allow students to study and prepare for their state insurance licensing exams from any computer with an internet connection. The program can be accessed any time of the night or day! 


Virtual Classroom Demo!

 adjuster virtual classroom


Adjusters Complete SELF-STUDY Course Packages

insurance adjuster schoolIncludes: A State and Exam Specific Textbook/Manual, our one-of-a-kind Online Practice Exam Simulator, and your Exam Outline published by your state insurance department or state testing vendor.

adjuster virtual classroom


claims adjuster training

Adjusters Online Practice Exam Simulators

Includes: Builds exams from a database of over 1000 questions. Our exams are specific to your state and your exam!

adjuster virtual classroom


What is a CATASTROPHE ADJUSTER?

In the event of a catastrophe where there are insufficient Licensed Adjusters in the affected area to handle claims expeditiously, Non-Resident Adjusters will be permitted to enter the State to handle the adjustments arising out of a catastrophe without being required to be licensed in the affected state. The Adjuster is required to exhibit evidence of an adjuster’s license in his/her home state and remains in the affected state only for a period of time that is necessary to assist in the adjustments.

To become licensed as an adjuster in your state, 
CLICK HERE
!

State Specific Training Products include:


Pre-Screen Employees...
Insurance Schools has developed an inexpensive pre-screening process to help companies determine which employees are suited for the insurance adjuster training school. This process has saved our clients much time and money by eliminating the expenses associated with training those who are not particularly suited for insurance adjusting.

Types of insurance adjusters:

  • Company Adjuster - A company adjuster is an adjuster representing the interests of the insurer, including independent contractors and salaried employees of the insurer.
  • Public Adjuster - An independent contractor representing solely the financial interests of the insured named in the policy. The insured and not the insurance company pays the adjuster.

3.  An insurance adjuster is expected to perform all or some of the following tasks:

  • Inspect damaged properties and estimate amount of loss.
  • Determine if claimants' policies cover the type of damage they are claiming.
  • Talk to policyholders, witnesses, and police to gather information. Read hospital records and police reports.
  • Analyze information about claims. May contact policyholders or insurance agents to clarify information.
  • Write reports explaining their decisions.
  • Negotiate with policyholders to settle claims.
  • Gather evidence to support contested claims in court. Meet with lawyers.
  • May testify in court.

The Adjuster's Investigation:

The adjuster's investigation may be as simple as verification of bills and estimates, or it may be expanded to include taking photographs, interviewing witnesses, or recording statements, as the circumstances require. Also, the facts obtained during the adjuster's initial investigation must be transferred into evidence, if and when the claim goes into suit, so that allegations made by the insurer may be substantiated.

A general plan of investigation will consist of all or some of the following elements in this sequence:

1. Critical Evidence -

• Statement of the adverse driver (if an auto case).
• Statement of the claimant (or claimants in the order of the
   severity of the injuries).
• Photograph of the accident scene, showing skid marks and
   other evidence of the accident.
• Examination and photographs of the vehicles themselves
   showing the damage and point of impact.
• The product itself or the instrumentality causing the injury.

2. Fact Evidence -

• Statements of disinterested witnesses.
• Statement of the insured, his driver, or employee having
  knowledge of the accident, the instrumentality causing it, or
  the part of the premises in which the accident is alleged to
  have occurred.
• Negative statements from persons who were in a position to
  have seen the accident or have some knowledge of its
  occurrence, but who deny having such knowledge.


3. Official Reports -

• Police report
• State motor vehicle reports filed by the parties to the accident
• Fire department reports
• Reports of state motor vehicle inspectors
• Traffic court proceedings
• Arraignment in magistrate court
• Death certificates
• Autopsy reports
• Coroner's inquest transcript
• Birth and marriage certificates
• Weather reports
• School records
• Certified copies of court records showing prior convictions of
   crimes
• Hack bureau reports (if a taxi cab is involved)
• C.A.B. reports (aircraft)
• I.C.C. reports (interstate truckers)
• Coast Guard reports (boats)


4. Unofficial Reports -

• Newspaper accounts

5. Medical Reports -

• Hospital records
• Attending physician's report and records
• Medical or hospital reports covering preexisting injury or disease

6. Documentary Evidence -

• Deeds of ownership of land
• Leases

• Contracts and agreements, especially contracts for
   construction, alterations and repair, as well as hold harmless
   agreements

7. Visual Evidence -

• Diagrams or sketches of the scene of the accident
• Engineering plats
• X-rays
• Photographs

8. Verification Evidence –

• Employer's records to show wage loss
• Index bureau reports
• Workers' compensation claims made by injured, arising out of
   the same accident

9. Expert Evidence -

• Report of company medical examiner
• Automobile inspector or appraiser
• Engineer or chemist
• Actuaries
• Handwriting expert

  New Page 3